Anxiety From the Beginning

Anxiety From the Beginning

Aargh, Insomnia at work again! This time it’s like I’m mulling over a hundred things at once; one of those things is my use of “underlying” in relation to my previous post concerning anxiety. Part of the reason is because I was reading a blog post someone had written about “How they cured their anxiety” and it got me thinking how even when things in my life seem to be going fine, the anxiety is still there niggling away under the surface ready to pounce at a moment of weakness.

One of my early memories of feeling anxious was when I was a kid and it we were running late for a church production rehearsal that I was involved in – a child worried about being late is a bit of an oxymoron; there may have been earlier times of worry. I also have memories when I was a childishly bossy in a true firstborn child manner.

I think the anxiety got stronger as I got older and life kept pounding me with curveballs and would knock me for a six (my hubby is a sports fanaticJ)

Anyway the earliest memory I can recall of having a panic attack was when I was 17, in my last year at High School and had pressure from numerous aspects of my life. Someone in my Home Room threw a paper ball at me – or something, and I just snapped and burst into tears. I ended up in the Sick Bay and while there the Deputy Principal (I think) gave me a glass of water to drink to try and calm me down, the glass had to be put down pretty rapidly  when I almost broke it because my teeth where chattering so much with the intensity of my emotions.

There have been other instances where I have had panic/anxiety attacks and it always seems to be after something small comes along to top things of and send me into a spiral. Most of the time I try to hold it together until I’m away from people, as I sometimes feel embarrassed to feel the way I do in those times and don’t want people’s pity. I don’t know why but I most of the time I feel like I have to be the strong one and the truth is that is tiring; I also don’t like being a burden to anyone and if I do feel like I’m being a burden it seems to make the anxiety/depression worse.

Well, that’s me for now.

T.

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Not Always Mind Over Matter

Not Always Mind Over Matter

Anxiety

In this fast pace world we live in with all the opportunities available; and all the talk of tolerance and acceptance, Anxiety and depression still seems to get a hard rap. Those with Anxiety and/or depression are told to “harden up” or “you just need to keep busy” or “Think positive”. These are nice statements and are most likely said with the best of intentions. Sometimes though its not as easy as that.

Sometimes you can try to “Think positively” but it can be a battle, even when you have a great support network; turning off negative thoughts can seem impossible. How anxiety or depression is portrayed can differ from person to person. How a person gets through it at a particular moment can differ from person to person, what works for one person may not work for another.

A person with anxiety can get anxious over what may seem a trifling issue; however the workings of the persons mind can be in overdrive. Sometimes it feels like anxious thought/feelings and common sense are battling each other and you really want common sense to win but that can be a hard outcome to achieve.

Those with Anxiety/Depression sometimes seemed to be deemed as weak, however that can be further from the truth that you know. When a person battles with Anxiety/depression daily they are actually quite tough with every day that they don’t give in to the Black Hole.

The attempt to always seem happy can be a battle as well, when you are smiling and laughing on the outside but are screaming on the inside; or when you’re spiraling downwards but you are afraid to let people know so you work even harder at putting on a happy face; some may do this through being comical.

A person who’s affected by anxiety/depression needs support and not judgment. They need to feel supported and that they are not a burden when they ask for help. Sometimes people dealing with anxiety/depression won’t ask for help either because they feel ashamed, or they don’t want to burden others. When you offer help let it be genuine and selfless and not about you earning “Brownie Points” so to speak.